The World’s N1 Billiards Online Game Play pool for free: 8-ball, snooker, 9-ball
Support
Snooker Rules
1. Requirements of the Game
The playing area in our Game within the cushion faces measure 10 x 5 ft (2950 х 1450 mm). The balls have a diameter of 52.5mm. The game played with white cue ball and twenty-one object balls — fifteen object balls that are not numbered and are solid red (called reds), and six object balls of other colors that are not numbered (called colors).

2. Object of the Game
One player must score a greater number of points than opponent. The winner of a frame is the player making the highest score.

To prepare for the first shot, the player sets the cue ball anywhere within the “D zone” so that it can be aimed at a red ball.

The objective is to score more points that the opponent by potting balls and, less commonly, by playing snookers that will force the opponent to make a foul stroke and thus give points away. This tactic employed at any time during a frame is to leave the cue ball behind a ball not on such that it is snookered for the next player.

If a player or side is more points behind than are available from the balls left on the table, then the laying of snookers in the hope of gaining points from fouls becomes most important.

3. General
Each turn is called a "break" and consists of a series of strikes of the cue ball that come to an end when a player makes a non-scoring strike or a foul stroke.

The accumulation of points with a series of successful pocketed balls in snooker is called a break. The highest break you can achieve in a frame of snooker, that is managing to successfully pocket all 15 red balls alternatively with 15 black balls and all of the colored balls in order, is officially recognized as 147 and is known as a maximum break. If a player is awarded a free-ball there is a possible break of 155 on, though this is not recognized as the maximum break total.

A legally potted ball entitles the striker to continue the break at the table until he fails to legally pot a ball.

The cue ball must be played from where it finished after the previous shot unless it was potted (when the striker has cue ball in hand within the half circle zone; he may place the base of the cue ball anywhere on the line or within the half circle zone).

Whenever a player is not able to directly play the ball to be struck with a straight shot, that position of the cue ball is called "snookered". In this case the opponent is required either to swerve the white ball around another ball or to bounce the cue ball off one or more cushions in order to hit the target ball.

4. Free Ball state
If, following a foul shot, the cue ball is snookered, the next player may take a "free ball" — nominate any ball at the table as the “ball on”. In other words, when a player leaves an opponent unable to hit both sides of at least one ball "on" after a foul, the other player will receive a free ball. This means, when the player receive the “free ball” state, he has the option to play any ball on the table as if it was the ball that should properly be played next (called “ball on”). For example, if a “free ball” occurs on a red, the player may play any color as if it were a red.

The first touched ball, other than the “ball on”, is called as the “free ball” and can be potted.

If the “free ball” (this means any ball, other than the “ball on”) was hit first by the cue ball, both the "free ball" and the “ball on” can be potted simultaneously without a foul. If the color ball as the "free ball" is potted, it is spotted; red balls are never spotted.

After the shot in the “free ball” state, if the cue ball snookered by the “free ball”, it is a foul, except when only the pink and black remain on the table.

5. Playing
For the first stroke of each turn, until all reds are off the table, red or a “free ball”, nominated as a red, is the “ball on”.

In all cases, the next ball to be potted, must be the first ball struck by the cue ball or a foul shot is declared. So when a player has next to pot a red ball, if a ball other than a red ball (except the “free ball” state) is struck first, it is a foul stroke.

When the next legal object is a color ball, only the ball that was hit first by the cue ball is can be potted, otherwise it is a foul (exclude the “free ball” state, then the "free ball" was hit first and the “ball on” was potted).

This means, a combination shot never be used to legally pocket color ball, unless the “free ball” was struck first and when the “ball on” was potted. Combination shots are allowed provided that the player has next to pot a red ball and hits one of any red balls, or in the “free ball” state (pocket the “ball on” using a “free-ball” in a combination shot).

When the next legal object is a red ball or the “free ball” nominated as red, any red ball (not only the first touched red ball or “free ball”) or several red balls can be pocketed on the same shot.

If the “free ball” (this means any ball, when the player receive a “free ball” state) was hit first by the cue ball, both the "free ball" and the “ball on” can be potted simultaneously without a foul.

When the striker has a red ball as his "ball on" (legal object ball), he must cause the cue ball's first contact to be with a red ball. A strike is legal when only red balls are potted. Failure to do so is a foul.

The red or any “free ball” nominated as a red, potted on a legal shot, is scored. If the color ball, nominated as a “free red”, is potted, it is spotted. When the strike on the red ball is legal and several red balls pocketed on the same shot, it is not a foul; the player gets one point only independently of the number of red balls he has potted.

If a red, or a “free ball” nominated as a red, is legally potted, the same player plays the next stroke and the next ball on is any color ball. If red balls remains on the table, or the last red ball pocketed on the previous legal shot, the next legal object is any color ball of the striker’s choice which, if legally potted, is scored and the color ball is then spotted. When no reds remain on the table, striker's balls on become the colors, in ascending numerical order (2,3,4,5,6,7).

The break is continued by potting reds and colors alternately until all the reds are off the table and, where applicable, any color ball has been played at following the potting of the last red. After the final red ball and its accompanying any color have been potted, the balls must be potted in order starting with yellow and finishing with black.

If the striker fails to score or commits a foul, his turn ends and the next player plays from where the cue-ball comes to rest, or from in-hand within the half circle if the cue-ball was potted.

6. Scoring
Points are scored in two ways: by legally potting reds or colors, and players are awarded points for fouls by the opponent.

Each legally potted red ball has a point value of one; each legally potted color ball has a point value as: Yellow valued 2, Green 3, Brown 4, Blue 5, Pink 6 and Black 7.

Scoring strokes in a player’s turn are made by potting reds and colors alternately until all the reds are off the table and then the colors in the ascending order of their value.

Points awarded for scoring strokes are added to the score of the striker. Penalty points from fouls are added to the opponent’s score.

If the “ball on” is potted it is scored.

If the ball as the "free ball" is potted, the value of the “ball on” is scored. This means, if the color ball nominated as a “free red” is potted, the value of red ball (one point) is scored.

If both the "free ball" and the “ball on” are potted, only the value of the “ball on” is scored.

7. Hitting two balls Simultaneously
Two balls, other than two reds or a “free ball” and a “ball on”, must not be struck simultaneously by the first impact of the cue ball; it is a foul.

8. Spotting Balls
Reds are never spotted. Reds illegally potted are not spotted; they remain off the table. Colors illegally potted are spotted.

When no reds remain on the table, legally potted colors are not spotted after each is potted; they remain off the table; illegally potted are spotted.

9. Fouls
If a shot is not played within defined time, it is a foul.

Causing the cue ball to miss all object balls, or the cue ball to enter a pocket, is a foul.

Failure to contact a legal object ball first (a ball not on) is a foul.

Causing the cue ball to first hit simultaneously two balls, other than two reds or a “free ball” and a “ball on”, is a foul.

If the striker's ball on is a red, and he pots a color, it is a foul; any red ball pocketed on the same legal shot is not a foul (except the “free ball” state).

If the striker's ball on is a color, and he pots any other ball (red or color), it is a foul (except the “free ball” state).

If the striker fails to score or commits a foul, his turn ends and the next player plays from where the cue-ball comes to rest, or from in-hand within the “D zone” if the cue-ball was potted.

To play from in-hand, the cue ball must be struck from a position on or within the lines of the "D zone" (half circle); it may be played in any direction.

After a foul has been called, the next player may elect to play any red, where red was the ball on, or the color in ascending numerical order, where all reds were off the table.

If more than one foul is committed in the same stroke, the highest value penalty shall be incurred.

The player may not snooker their opponent behind a free-ball, except that is when only the colored balls pink and black remain on the table; it is a foul stroke.

10. End of Frame
Eventually all balls except the black have been potted.

When only the Black is left, the first score or foul ends the frame excepting only if the scores are then equal.

When the scores are equal and the Black is potted, the Black is spotted, and the next score or foul ends the frame.

Special rule: Three consecutive times failure to play a shot within time limit is a loss of game.

Back to top